Speaker Resources

This page is designed for IT Professional Conference Speakers. Below you will find plenty of resources for you to use! If you have any questions, you should email your individual speaker advocate (the person who contacted you to tell you your presentation was accepted).
Upcoming Practice/Support Sessions:
Check back soon for more information!
 
Jump to Content:
Pre-Recorded Sessions   |  Video and Audio Tips and Tricks   |   Live Sessions   |   Learning How to Present (Videos)

Pre-Recorded Sessions

Choosing a Program to Record Your Presentation

We want you to use a software program that is easy for you. We recommend the following options for recording, but you can use whatever you would like. If you are trying to figure out what is best for you, check out the recommendations below. Under each section is a short list of pros and cons for each. (The programs are listed top to bottom from most simple to most difficult.)

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Microsoft PowerPoint

Office 365 is free for all UW-Madison faculty and staff, making this the easiest option available to you. You can create a PowerPoint and then either record into the slide by selecting the “Insert” tab and clicking “Audio.” You can also record by going to the “Slideshow” tab and clicking “Record Slideshow.” Both options allow you to rerecord over sections where you mess up and/or pause where you need to take a break.

Pros:
  • Free and easy to use
  • Windows users can export their slides as a video file easily
  • Can be used for multiple presenters by using the Insert > Audio option
Cons:
  • Mac users cannot export their slides with audio to video (will need to send the PPT file to us and we can convert it to video for you!)
  • This only records your voice over the slides, so we will not see an image of you on the screen
  • Cannot incorporate “live” screen demos — there are ways to record your screen and add as a video into your slides, but cannot record your screen directly in PowerPoint
How to Install PowerPoint:
Links to Helpful Resources:

Recording Audio in PowerPoint (LinkedIn Learning)
Record and Narrate your PowerPoint (LinkedIn Learning)
Export your PowerPoint as a Video *Windows only* (LinkedIn Learning)

Apple Keynote for Mac

Keynote is free for anyone who owns a Mac, making this another easy option. You can create a slideshow and then record by going to the “Document” button in the upper right, then clicking the “Audio” tab, and clicking the “Record” button. This recording option also allows you to re-record over sections where you mess up and/or pause where you need to take a break.

Pros:
  • Free and easy to use for Mac users
  • Easily export as a video file
Cons:
  • This only records your voice over the slides, so we will not see an image of you on the screen
  • Cannot incorporate “live” screen demos — there are ways to record your screen and add as a video into the slides, but you cannot record your screen directly in Keynote
Links to Helpful Resources:

Recording and Exporting your Keynote Presentation as a Video (LinkedIn Learning)

Loom

Loom is currently free for all UW-Madison faculty and staff if you sign up using your @wisc email. While this program allows you to record both yourself and your screen for both Windows and Mac, it works best with Macs. You can record yourself over a PowerPoint or Keynote, or over a live demo. You’ll need to install the desktop application for the best recording (there is also a Google Chrome extension).

Pros:
  • Free (for now)
  • Records both your screen and yourself (unless you turn off your camera)
  • HD video quality for Macs
Cons:
  • Does not unload directly to Kaltura, so you’ll have to send the video for us to upload
  • Does not record HD video on Windows machines (untested)
How to Get Loom:

Sign-Up for Loom (use your @wisc email for the free account)
Install the Loom Desktop Application

Adobe Premiere Pro (Video Editing Program)

Adobe Premiere Pro is free for all UW-Madison faculty and staff, making this another relatively easy option for you! This is a video editing program that has a high learning curve. This can be used to compile videos, images, and audio together into an engaging video. You can record your voice as an audio file and put it over a PowerPoint or Keynote that has been converted to image files, or you can voice over a screen recording you did in a different program (like QuickTime or Screen Record). You’ll need to install the desktop application.

Pros:
  • Free!
  • High quality video exports
  • Lots of ways to customize your video
Cons:
  • High learning curve (not recommended for those who don’t already know it)
  • No built in screen recording software
  • Requires a powerful computer, preferably a desktop (check your specifications!)
How to Install Adobe Premiere Pro:

UW-Madison Knowledge Base – Adobe Creative Cloud (Premiere must be installed using Adobe Creative Cloud)

Links to Helpful Resources:

Adobe Premiere Pro Essential Training (LinkedIn Learning)

How to Supplement Your PowerPoint/Keynote with Video or Screen Capture:

Below are some ways to work around using Kaltura Capture or Loom if you only want to show a few seconds of screen capture, videos of yourself, or even a few quick screen grabs…

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

QuickTime for Mac (for Screen Capturing or Recording Yourself Using a Webcam)

QuickTime is free for anyone who owns a Mac, making this an easy option for screen recording or recording yourself to incorporate into a Keynote or PowerPoint. Just open QuickTime and click File > New Screen Recording to start recording part of or all of your screen or File > New Movie Recording to record yourself using your microphone and camera. ***Once you are finished recording go to File > Export As and select the highest resolution you can!***

Pros:
  • Free and easy to use for Mac users
  • Easily export as a high quality video file
Cons:
  • This either records your screen (no audio) or your camera with audio but not both at the same time
  • “Movie Recordings” (using your camera) are limited in quality by the quality of your webcam
Links to Helpful Resources:

Recording Audio and Video in QuickTime (LinkedIn Learning)

Screenshots for Macs

Need to take a simple screenshot for your slideshow? Use the following commands:
Command + Shift + 3 — To take a screenshot of your entire screen
Command + Shift + 4 — To select the area for a screenshot (not the entire screen)
Command + Shift + 4 + Space Bar — To open screenshot options
Command + Shift + 5 — (For macOS Mojave or later) To open screen capture/record options

Links to Helpful Resources:

Apple Support: Take a Screenshot on Your Mac

Screen Capture for Windows 10 using XBox Game Bar (for Screen Capturing with or without Audio)

XBox Game Bar is free for anyone who owns a Windows machine, making this an easy option for screen recording to incorporate into a Keynote or PowerPoint. Just search for XBox Game Bar under your start menu. This program was designed to record people gaming, but can be used easily without playing games. It will also record your voice or the audio from your screen if you adjust the settings properly.

Pros:
  • Free and easy to use for Windows users
  • Easily exports as a high quality video file to your computer
Cons:
  • Need to adjust the settings so that you get the quality of audio and/or screen capture that you want before you start
Links to Helpful Resources:

Article: Windows 10 has a built-in free screen recorder that you might not know about
Video: How to Record Your Computer Screen in Windows 10 (YouTube)

Camera App for Windows 10 (for Recording Yourself using a Webcam)

The Camera App is free for anyone who owns a Windows machine, making this the easiest option for recording video of yourself to incorporate into a Keynote or PowerPoint. Just search for the Camera App in the start menu. It defaults to photos, so you’ll need to click the video camera option to record yourself.

Pros:
  • Free and easy to use for Windows users
  • Easily exports as a decent quality video file to your computer
Cons:
  • No editing features
Links to Helpful Resources:

Microsoft Support: How to Use the Camera App

Screenshots for Windows

Open the free Snipping Tool to take a screenshot! You can take the entire screen, a rectangular section of the screen, or a free-form shape. Shortcut: Windows Key + Shift + S

Links to Helpful Resources:

Windows Support: Use Snipping Tool to Capture Screenshots

Using the Built-In Recording in a Zoom/WebEx Meeting

Multiple Presenters? What should you do?

Below are some ways to work collaboratively on a presentation (again from easiest to hardest):

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

PowerPoint

Since this allows you to record directly onto slides, this is by far the easiest. You can just have each person record their audio onto “their slides” and then export it as a video (or if using a Mac, send to us to make the video). Downside is that it may not feel seamless, as the audio is recorded separately. Additionally, you only get audio and not video of the presenters.

Zoom

You can install Zoom on your machine, invite everyone to the call and record your session as if it were live, just like WebEx. All UW-Madison affiliates can have a free Zoom account (Sign in at: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/). You’ll need to adjust your settings for everyone to have the ability to share their screens. Additionally, if using the desktop application and not the browser extension, you can draw on one another’s screens and use arrows to highlight what is being shown. Downside of is that since it is a video call, you may experience some connectivity issues, but less so than with WebEx or BBC Ultra.
When recording a meeting you can also choose whether to record to a local computer or to the Zoom cloud. If sent to the cloud, it will have a limited time before it is deleted. All recording should have auto-generated captions as a separate file.

WebEx

You can install WebEx and login using UW-Madison SSO (but you may need to try your NetID@wisc.edu and your preferred email if they differ to login), invite everyone to the call and record your session as if it were live. Unlike Zoom, you don’t need to adjust settings for folks to share their own screens. Additionally, if using the desktop application and not the browser extension, you can draw on one another’s screens and use arrows to highlight what is being shown. Downside of WebEx is mostly in its user interface, which takes a little bit to get used to. Further, since it is a video call, you may experience some connectivity issues.
Note: The recording does take a few hours to process and will be available via the host’s WebEx account for download. There is also usually captions with the rendered video if you have that set up in your account.

How to End/Sign-off Your Pre-Recorded Content…

In order to make sure that you’re saying the correct information at the end of your video, we encourage you to sign off the end of your pre-recorded presentation with the following statement:
“Check out the description below for how to contact me with questions.”
This way, we can provide your preferred contact method, any live Q&A sessions, etc. separate from the recording.

Video and Audio Tips and Tricks

Setting the Scene

If you’re planning to be on camera, you want to make sure that you have a good setup so your audience is not distracted by your video and they can focus on the content of your presentation. Follow these tips to set the scene for your video:

  • Avoid a cluttered background. A bookshelf with lots of books or knick-knacks can distract your audience. A blank wall or wall with limited artwork is your friend.
  • Try to put your camera at eye level. This may mean propping up your computer or propping up yourself.
  • Talk directly to and look at the camera when possible. It is often uncomfortable to watch videos where the speaker is not making eye-contact with the audience and are always looking down or away from the camera. If you need help with this, consider putting a sticker or image near the camera and talking to that.
  • Make sure you have a comfortable seat and posture, so you’re not moving/shifting position much during the presentation.
  • If you decide to stand, avoid moving around and out of the camera’s view.
  • Avoid using a swivel chair or chair on wheels when recording, because it is easy to nervously move or spin.
  • Find a space that avoids interruptions from children, pets, partners, roommates, etc.

Good Lighting

PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR LIGHTING. You don’t want to be too bright (like a ghost) or too dark (like a shadow) in your video if you are going to be showing your face. Follow these helpful tips to make yourself look great on camera:

  • Avoid using only overhead lighting, which will shadow the bottom of your face.
  • Avoid backlight like a window behind you during daylight.
  • Put yourself facing a window for natural light during daylight.
  • Make your computer screen white/light yellow in front of you to illuminate yourself. Your computer screen gives off lots of light
  • Use a lamp in front of you or slightly to the side of you to illuminate your face.
    • Try taking off the lamp shade or putting it back on to find which looks best. Bouncing lights off of walls also helps soften light on your face.
  • If possible, use multiple sources of light (3-point lighting) for limiting shadows on your face.

Good Audio

TEST YOUR AUDIO BEFORE YOU RECORD OR GOING LIVE! Try recording something using whatever you’re going to use and play it back. If it sounds bad to you, try these helpful tips to make it better:

  • Avoid large rooms and rooms with wood flooring, which can create echoes.
  • Try to find a smaller room, preferably with carpet/rugs.
  • If you live near a busy street or the airport, avoid recording during busy times/rush hour so you don’t get traffic noises.
  • Avoid rooms near HVAC systems or refrigerators, which have small hums and other electrical noise interference.
    • Test this: If you hold your breath and listen for a few seconds to the ambient sound in the room and it starts to sound “loud” then it isn’t a good room.
  • If you have an external microphone, use it!
  • If you have earbuds with a microphone on the cable, try to avoid letting the microphone rub against your clothing. Hold it away from your body or prop it away from your chest with a clip.
  • If you’re using a built-in computer microphone, make sure that it is unobstructed and there is a direct line from your mouth to the microphone.
  • Speak clearly as if you are talking to a room full of people. It can be easy to forget when recording that you are presenting.
  • KEEP A BEVERAGE NEARBY. Whether going live or pre-record, you don’t want to be caught with a tickle in your throat. Drink between takes or as often as you need to keep yourself hydrated.

Live Sessions

All live sessions will likely use Zoom or WebEx.
 
Practicing: Work with your speaker contact to find a time to practice or come to one of the practice sessions (listed at the top of this page).
Moderating: You will be working with your speaker contact to coordinate how you would like to run your session. Your speaker contact will moderate for you or find someone who can moderate for you if they are unavailable. You do not need to run the session alone! 🙂
Participant Discussion: You will work with your speaker contact to figure out the best way to run discussion, whether you would like to be interrupted, you would like raised hands, you would questions only in the chat, or some combination of these.
Sharing Content:  You can either share your screen, share a Google Chrome Tab, or share an application window. You can also share files. Practice how you’ll be sharing content prior to your appointment so you can be sure it works the way you would like!

Learning How to Present (Videos)

Designing Pre-Recorded or Voiced-Over Presentations

Designing Digital Slideshows for Presentations or Speeches (Live, not pre-recorded)